Third Quarter Preservation Conversations Lectures

Join the QQA for these FREE and open to the public lectures every second Thursday of the month.    

July 11:  Roofting Historic Buildings with Bray Sheet Metal   

Join the QQA to learn about roofing historic buildings with Woody Simmons and Robert Purtle of Bray Sheet Metal. Woody and Robert have worked on historic buildings all around the state, including:

  • The Clock Tower on the Court House on the Monroe County Court House
  • English Clay Tile in Clarendon, AR
  • Peabody Hall at the U of A Campus in Fayetteville, AR
  • Clay tile and copper built-in gutters at the Augusta Court House
  • Copper Built-in gutters at the Empress in Little Rock
  • Repair and maintain slate roof at the Lincoln Home, Little Rock, AR
  • Repairs to asbestos slate at the Pollock Home, Little Rock, AR
  • New Standing Seam Metal Roof and Copper built-in gutters at the Old Mill, North Little Rock, AR.
  • Reroof wood shingles after fire at St Edwards Catholic Church, Little Rock. AR.
  • Install Slate roof, Cathedral of St. Andrew, Little Rock, AR.

Event Info: 

  • When: July 11, 2019
  • Where: Mixing Room at the Old Paint Factory in the East Village,1306 East 6th Street, 72202
  • What Time: 5:30 pm (reception); 6:00 pm (lecture)
  • RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP. You can RSVP Here. 
  • Parking: There is parking directly in front of the doors that are marked “live”, “print”, “meet." If those spots are taken. park in the parking lot to the right. There is also street parking in front of the building.
  • Entrance: Enter the event space through the door facing 6th Street marked "Meet."
  • Questions? Call 501-371-0075 ext. 3 or email qqa@quapaw.com

August 8: Preservation Conversation: Quapaw Tribal Pottery with Betty Geadtke

Join us for a lecture about Quapaw Tribal Pottery by Betty Gaedtke, a member of the Quapaw Nation.

  • Where: Mixing Room at the Old Paint Factory in the East Village,1306 East 6th Street, 72202
  • What Time: 5:30 pm (reception); 6:00 pm (lecture)
  • RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP .
  • Parking: There is parking directly in front of the doors that are marked “live”, “print”, “meet." If those spots are taken. park in the parking lot to the right. There is also street parking in front of the building.
  • Entrance: Enter the event space through the door facing 6th Street marked "Meet."
  • Questions? Call 501-371-0075 ext. 3 or email qqa@quapaw.com

Betty Gaedtke Artist's Statement:

"My interest in making pottery began decades ago, but since I had a full time job with the US Postal Service, it was nearly impossible for me to dedicate the time for it. When I retired early, my husband and I bought property near Yellville, Arkansas. In 2010 we built a house there and moved to our getaway in the Ozark Mountains. I was very fortunate that in our local area there are numerous potters, many whom studied and taught all over the country and the world. I soon became friends with many of them and began personal one on one lessons and monthly group workshops with experienced potters. I was mentored by Helen Phillips, a world renowned potter and teacher, Robin MacGrogan, a lifelong potter and professor in pottery and the arts, Sue Whittington, an experienced potter, and Marian Yancey, an experienced potter. As I became more comfortable making my own pottery, in 2012 I decided to dive into where my real passion was, pottery made by my Quapaw tribal ancestors. I took personal one on one lessons with Lisa Crews, experienced in Mississippian pottery, who taught me how to make head pots and animal & human effigy pots in Quapaw and Mississippian styles. I have since made about 300 Quapaw and Mississippian pots making them in the styles and decorations unearthed in Quapaw villages. My inspiration comes from my many visits to museums that display Quapaw pottery and twice viewing hundreds of Quapaw pots stored at the University of Arkansas. I have read many books that are dedicated to some of the best Quapaw and Mississippian pottery ever found. I have pots displayed at several museums around the country. "

September 12:  Preservation Conversation: The History of UAMS at its 140th Birthday by Tim Nutt

Join the QQA for a free lecture and discussion about the history of UAMS by Tim Nutt. The success of the institution now-known as UAMS seemed uncertain after its rocky establishment in 1879. During the last 140 years, events, interesting personalities, and politics have shaped the state's only academic health center.

Tim Nutt is currently employed as the Director of the Historical Research Center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Previously, he was employed as the Head of Special Collections at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville and as founding Deputy Curator of the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies at the Central Arkansas Library System. He also served as the founding Managing Editor and Staff Historian of the award-winning online Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture.

A native of Bigelow, Arkansas, Nutt received a B.A. in History from the University of Central Arkansas and a masters in Library Science, with an emphasis on archives, from the University of Oklahoma. He is a past president of the Arkansas Historical Association and a Certified Archivist.

Event Info:

  • When: September 12, 2019
  • Where: Mixing Room at the Old Paint Factory in the East Village,1306 East 6th Street, 72202
  • What Time: 5:30 pm (reception); 6:00 pm (lecture)
  • RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP .
  • Parking: There is parking directly in front of the doors that are marked “live”, “print”, “meet." If those spots are taken. park in the parking lot to the right. There is also street parking in front of the building.
  • Entrance: Enter the event space through the door facing 6th Street marked "Meet."
  • Questions? Call 501-371-0075 ext. 3 or email qqa@quapaw.com

Preservation Conversations is supported in part by the Arkansas Humanities Council, the Quapaw Nation, and in anonymous gift in honor of Carl Miller, Jr.